Associate Professor Kelvin Kong - Royal Institute for Deaf & Blind Children

Associate Professor Kelvin Kong

RIDBC Background

Professor Kong qualified as the first Aboriginal Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS). He practices in Newcastle as a surgeon specialising in otolaryngology, and ENT surgery.

Professor Kong hails from the Worimi people of Port Stephens, Newcastle, NSW. After completing his degrees in Medicine and Surgery in 1999, he embarked on an internship at St Vincent’s Hospital, and pursued a surgical career, completing resident medical officer and registrar positions at various institutions. Along the way, he has been privileged to serve the urban, rural and remote communities, and humbled to be active in committee roles with RACS, AIDA, NCIE and local hospital initiatives.

Dr Kong has always championed the improvement of health and education and regularly publishes and reviews articles on ENT conditions and Indigenous health issues nationally and internationally. He also teaches surgical trainees, allied health professionals and medical students. Complementing his surgical training, he is kept grounded by his strong, medical family, who are strength and inspiration for him as he remains involved in numerous projects and committees to help give back to the community. 

Specialities and interests

Adult and paediatric otology, rhinology, laryngology practice, paediatric airway, adult and paediatric cochlear implantation, voice and swallow disorders and head and neck cancer management.

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Science (BSc)
  • Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS)
  • Fellowship of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (FRACS)

Work

Primary: Hunter ENT

  • John Hunter Hospital/Children’s Hospital
  • Newcastle Private Hospital
  • Hunter Valley Private Hospital

Profile link and research articles

Hunter ENT Profile

Hunter Medical Research Institute: Researcher Interview

Medical Journal of Australia

University of Newcastle Article: Addressing the Gap in Australian Indigenous Health Outcomes